Infrared Training Center

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Blower Door Inspection for Air Infiltration in a Remodeled Cottage

By Tom Coffey, Infrared Training Center 

ITC logo registeredA small cottage (700 sq. ft) outside of Knoxville, TN was completely remodeled from January to March 2010. It was an existing cinder block structure with no insulation except ½ inch of airspace between the nailers and the block wall as well as the empty block core. The R value of existing building walls was approximately 2.97. After the remodel an R-value was calculated and determined to be 12.6

2 x 4 studs were used to build the interior walls the insulated with 4” of backed fiberglass bat insulation. Old windows were removed and new double pane sash type windows installed during the remodel.

The house was depressurized to approximately 50 Pascal and allowed to equalize for 30 minutes. A thermographic scan was performed after the equalization period. Infiltration was found around the sash windows where the top and bottom pieces join in the corners of the windows.

Picture1 Picture2

There was some expected infiltration around the front door which was missing a sweep on the bottom of the door. Also infiltration was found at the attic access.

Picture3 Picture4

All of these small problems are easily correctable and will be done as time permits.

The installation of the blower door took approximately 30-45 minutes. Reaching the right depressurization took another 30 minutes and the IR scan took another 45 minutes. For a house this size, allowing for the small footprint I did not do an air exchange calculation. The purpose of this exercise was to determine if the house remodel and adding insulation was sufficient to keep the house at a comfortable level during East Tennessee summers and winters. It was determined during the remodel process that R-13 insulation in the walls and R-19 insulation in the ceilings would be sufficient for the weather conditions in this area of the country.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Getting Started with R&D Thermography Online Course

ITC logo registeredVideo tutorials on IR Camera Properties and getting started with ResearchIR. For any SC camera including A300, A320, SC645, SC6000, SC6700, and SC7000, SC8000 cameras.  There is NO CHARGE for this FREE  course.

Includes information on:

  • Camera Technology
    • Cooled vs Uncooled Thermal Cameras: Field of View
    • The difference between cooled & uncooled thermal detectors?
    • Cooled vs Uncooled Thermal Cameras: Speed
    • Cooled vs Uncooled: Sensitivity
  • FLIR ResearchIR Max
    • Connecting to the Camera
    • Image Enhancement
    • Image Subtraction
    • Recording Data
    • Triggering
    • Super Framing
    • Analysis Tools
    • Analysis Charts
    • Measurement Functions
    • Sharing Data
    • File Extraction Tool
  • FLIR ResearchIR and MATLAB
    • FLIR Thermal Face Detection and Tracking in Matlab
    • Opening FLIR Movies with Matlab Software
    • Connecting FLIR Systems GigE Cameras to MATLAB
    • Applying MATLAB Filters in FLIR ResearchIR Max Software

   Course Registration and Information

Thursday, September 7, 2017

IR finds Yellow Jackets Nest in House

by Sanin Mulic, Barber Foods

After attending my level one instruction during the week, and ITC wetting my appetite for thermal imaging, I returned home with my company's P-65 camera.  I decided to scan my own house to practice what I was taught all week.  All looked good until I went upstairs and noticed a bright spot on the inside wall.  I took several images of the spot and come Monday, I talked to two level 2 associates about what I had found.  There were several possibilities and I was told to take several more shots at different times to see if it moved or varied in temperature.   When we found it never moved I suggested that it might be insects (wasps, hornets, etc.) and talked with one of the other thermographers who would bring in a stethoscope to see if  I could hear them before opening up the wall.

Wasps  Wasps-vis 
Thermal image of the wasp nest (left).

I couldn’t wait, so that night armed with a drill, a can of flying insect killer, and the enthusiasm of a new thermographer,  I went up to the room; my pet cat, who loves to lay in the window there, had to investigate with me too.   I approximated where the hotspot was and drilled a 1/8 “ hole through the wall board. As I removed the drill bit, about 8 to 10 yellow jackets came charging through the hole and I started to spray the bug spray at the hole.  By this time, the yellow jackets were in an attack mode and I started to swing at them in defense.  Out of the corner of my eye I saw my cat speeding to the door with his tail bigger than I have ever seen it.  I finally killed the last one, sprayed about 1/3 of the can, and plugged the hole; but not before being stung twice.  I went outside and saw a swarm just outside the window. I drilled a second hole a few inches above it and knowing what was going to follow,  I had the spray ready to go as soon as the drill came out.  I sprayed about 1/3 of the can and then plugged the hole. I returned several hours later and the swarm was gone.  I climbed a ladder and found a small hole where they were coming and going.  I plugged that from the outside.  As I came back inside I saw my cat peaking from around the door as if to ask “Is it safe to come out now?”

After a few days I took another thermal image and there was no evidence of the yellow jackets remaining.  I submitted this investigation as my level one field report and it passed, but the memory of this initial experience will last a long time (the cat won’t forget it either!)

No-wasps no-wasps-vis
No wasps after removal.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Why does my Infrared Camera read higher than my Infrared Temperature Gun?

 ITC Logo TM 250 The answer is, in a word, resolution. Take a look at the image below.

7-20-2010 1-48-44 PM

The infrared camera is able to locate and measure much smaller objects than an IR temperature gun. Note the spot measurement on the infrared image; its reading is 250 F. Contrast that to the average area measurement typical of an infrared gun at a reading of 184 F. The gun is averaging all the hot areas along with the cold areas of the grating we see in the image.

Another common question is why the IR camera reads a higher temperature than a contact temperature probe? Contact temperature probes require an extremely good contact in order to read a decent temperature. In fact these probes measure their own temperature, so if the heat transfer is not good from the substrate, and the probe sensor is colder than the surface, the temperature will be lower. Also remember that contact thermometers act as heat sinks, sucking heat out of a surface.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

IR Pictures Through a Grating or Mesh

Question from a customer: “Scanning through the steel grating I read a temperature 5 to 15 degrees Celsius lower than scanning without the grating. I know it is to do with the steel grating but I was wondering why.”
Great question. Let’s take a look at a typical situation with and without a grating, and then placing the grating at different distances to the camera.
The distance between the fuse and the camera remains constant, and the camera is always focused on the fuse. The only changes are the insertion of the grating, and the distance of the grating from the infrared camera.
IMG00077-20120215-1115IR_0001DC_0002
Figure 1. Looking at a fuse directly with no grating. Max temperature is 51.4 C.
IMG00078-20120215-1116IR_0003DC_0004
Figure 2. We have inserted the grating close to the fuse.
Max temperature dropped to 51 C, a small error.

Friday, August 18, 2017

What does Sensitivity (NETD) mean when applied to a Thermal Imager?

Sensitivity expresses the ability of an infrared camera to display a very good image even if the thermal contrast in a scene is low. Put another way, a camera with good sensitivity can distinguish objects in a scene that have very little temperature difference between them.
Sensitivity is most often measured by a parameter called Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference or NETD, for example, NETD @ 30 C : 80mK. A Kelvin degree is the SI base unit of thermodynamic temperature equal in magnitude to a degree Celsius, so mK means thousandths of a degree (80mK = 0.080 K).
What is NETD? NETD is defined as the amount of infrared radiation required to produce an output signal equal to the systems own noise. This is a noise rating of the system and should be as low as possible. We are not talking about how loud the system is here!!! We are talking about electronic noise that we translate into a temperature difference at an object temperature of 30 C (86 F).

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

New Online Course - FLIR ONE Basics

Description

This course will introduce you to the operation of the FLIR ONE infrared camera. This course is a self paced on-demand web course, you can start as soon as you enroll and you can stop and continue where you left off at any time. This is NO CHARGE for this course.
The goal of this course is simple: By the end of this course, you will be able to operate a FLIR ONE camera. Our instructional video will familiarize you with the basic camera functionality.
Who should take this course: This course is intended for users of the FLIR ONE camera or anyone interested in purchasing one.
Prerequisites: No prior knowledge of thermography or infrared cameras is assumed.
Availability: This course is an on-demand self paced web based training course available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can begin as soon as you enroll.
We highly recommend you take a thermography course after finishing this basics course. We offer the On-Demand Introduction to Level I and Thermography for Home Inspectors classes here, or Level I, Residential Energy Auditing, or Level I - Building Investigations Courses available at http://www.infraredtraining.com/ .

Objectives

  • Get Expert tips on IR camera operation
  • Explore the user interface buttons and menus
  • Learn how to operate the camera using a video and slide format to explore functions
  • See examples of applications for the FLIR ONE

Lessons

  1. Getting to Know your FLIR ONE (Online Lesson)
  2. Next Steps (Online Lesson)
  3. Course Evaluation and Certificate Generation (Online Lesson)

Certificates

  1. FLIR ONE Basics

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Call for Papers: ITC International User Conference - September 2017

Main paper presentations at the 2014 ITC User Conference in Stockholm, Sweden
Join the biggest ITC event in Europe and contribute with a paper, poster, or seminar!

ITC and FLIR Systems invite you to share your thermography expertise with other professionals in your field at the ITC User Conference in Coventry, UK, on September 27–28, 2017.

The ITC User Conference is a professional meeting place for technicians, engineers, scientists, and users of all types of infrared measurement equipment. It will cover infrared physics and its applications in a wide variety of fields, from inspection of electrical installations, building surveys, industrial and automation applications, optical gas imaging to NDT and advanced research applications.

Seminars, presentations, and poster sessions all depend on you and your contribution, so we ask you to submit your conference paper now:
  • Long paper - duration of the presentation about 40 minutes
  • Short paper - duration of the presentation about 20 minutes
  • Poster
  • Seminar - highlight trends and technologies with future importance for the field of thermography and infrared measurement.
The conference language is English.

Please submit the title and abstract by April 15, 2017 to Christiane Buchgeister at se@irtraining.eu

Abstracts
FLIR Tools was just one of the many seminars offered at the 2014 event in Sweden

Abstracts to be no longer than 500 words. The following information to be included: preferred type of presentation, title, primary author and affiliation, co-authors and affiliations, primary author’s contact details (full postal address, phone number, e-mail address), list of key words.

Notification of Acceptance or Refusal

ITC EMEA will notify all authors of its decision on 20 May 2017. This notification will include
instructions for the selected authors on how to prepare and submit their finished paper by August 14, 2017.

To encourage the exchange of applications, information, primary authors presenting their papers will attend the conference for only € 199.

If you would like to attend the event without presenting a paper, simply register at
www.infraredforum.eu/register or visit the conference website at www.infraredforum.eu
or email us at training@flir.se for more information.

Monday, January 30, 2017

New Training Dates Announced for sUAS Level I Thermography Certification

The new sUAS Level I Thermography Certification course from the Infrared Training Center (ITC) is designed for thermographers who require training specific to aerial IR inspections.  This class will cover all the potential applications, types of equipment used, what business opportunities exist, the infrared science behind how the technology works and the required regulations one needs to follow to enter this new and rapidly growing field.  As such, part of the course will also focus on introducing students to the FAA Part 107 rule which is required for all commercial sUAS operations in the United States.  

The following dates and locations have been announced in 2017:

Atlanta, GA
April 25-28

Boston, MA (ITC Headquarters - Nashua, NH)
May 15-18

Dallas, TX
June 6-9 


King of Prussia, PA
August 22-25

Nashville, TN
September 19-22

Learn More and Register Here

Attendees who successfully complete all course requirements, including their field assignment, will receive a sUAS level 1 Infrared thermography certification from ITC.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

New Online Course - Introduction to FAA Part 107 Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

The FAA has developed regulations to allow the operation of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS or drone) in the National Airspace System (NAS) for purposes other than hobby and recreation. The rules are specified in 14 CFR part 107 and address UAS classification, certification, and operating rules.

This course is designed to introduce applicants wishing to operate a sUAS for commercial purposes to Part 107 knowledge. In addition, we include an infrared thermography primer for those wishing to use airborne thermography as an inspection tool.

Course Structure
This course can be taken on a computer, tablet, or a smartphone. For the best experience, we suggest a device with a larger screen for easier readability. It will take approximately 1.25 hours to complete this material.

At the conclusion of each lesson, there will be a knowledge check followed by a lesson summary.

At the conclusion of the course, you may then print a course completion certificate. Presenting this certificate when registering for an instructor led Level I sUAS Certification Course will entitle you to a discount equal to the purchase price of this online course.

Learn More